Speeches

Sales Speech 11/05/12

Good morning y’all and welcome to the University of New Hampshire. UNH was founded in 1866 as the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, serving the sons and daughters of farming and laboring families in Hanover, NH. New Hampshire College moved to Durham in 1893 by a wealthy and prosperous farmer to further develop into the campus it is today. Today Durham is home to a little over 15,000 wildcats, with 2,257 of them being graduate students. The university offers a huge variety of different bachelor programs. While the most popular are business administration, psychology, English and communications, the university also prides itself in developing successful young graduates in mechanical engineering, biology, and political science.

What sets UNH far apart from the rest, is its recognition of the students. The university does a nice job in putting the students first. My senior year in college I applied to a dozen schools, with the hopes and dreams of getting into one school, BC. When I received that rejection later from BC at that moment I thought my life was over, because I couldn’t see myself fitting in comfortably anywhere else. My decision to come to UNH was because of its business and hockey program. On Day 1 I was welcomed by a spirited move-in crew who helped me lug all of my junk into Williamson. I met my future roommates, no better yet my current best-friends at UNH and hopefully after UNH at our first floor-meeting. I walked into Coach Umile’s office demanding to be a part of his program. That was all done on day one, and ever since I haven’t looked back. Mostly because I haven’t had the time to look back because of the people you surround yourself with here in Durham.

I thought in college it was survival of the fittest, every man for themselves. I was completely wrong. Professional relationships have been formed with professors who aren’t just there to lecture you, but to assist you in any way possible to help you fully understand the material at hand. These professors truly recognize the cost of tuition yet understand the value of an education in the future. The advisers at the university put you first, listening to your dreams and goals and assist you in devising a plan that will get you to where you want to be in 4 years. The opportunities that I have been provided with here at UNH I don’t think I would have had at BC or any other school. Yet more importantly, the friends, faculty, coaches and professionals I have networked with along the way I will forever cherish and embrace. I have found who I am and what I want to be right here in Durham, NH.

If you want the most memorable and beneficial four years of your life, apply to UNH. Visit and fall in love with its campus. Step into a classroom and leave in awe or step out of your comfort zone in hopes of pursuing a dream. Thank you and hope to see you next homecoming!

Rhetorical Role Model Speech— 09/10/2012

“I’m not here to tell you what to do; I’m here to tell you what can happen.” That is how my rhetorical role model started every one of his speeches. His name is Danny Duval. You don’t know Danny, and unfortunately you never will. Because this summer, I lost my hero, as my city lost its legend. Throughout Danny’s lifetime he had spoken to hundreds of schools about his battle with drugs and alcohol.

He spoke at my high school my junior year and ever since, has invited me to go along with him to watch him speak and inspire a generation. When Danny speaks, everyone listens. He doesn’t just walk on stage, he takes it. He uses the perfect balance of emotion and humor. With every funny story, there’s a sad one.

Danny breaks up his speech into three stages; his success as a high school athlete, his struggles with drug abuse and how he turned his life around. His speech was certainly epideictic, for it celebrated a successful turnaround in a person’s life. He put a lot of work and preparation into his speeches, not one speech was the exact same. The speeches begin action packed, hooking the audience immediately. He rarely moves, in fact he sometimes sits on the edge of the stage to not distract the audience. He makes it feel like you’re the only person in this large auditorium, as if he’s talking directly to you.

The way he ended every speech was with his motto, “It’s all about the three ships: relationships, friendships, and championships. If you have the first two, the third is just a bonus.” He is the reason why I want to one day speak about dwarfism and diversity. He has taught me how to speak from the heart not the head. He taught me that audiences don’t like to hear facts or numbers. He taught me to keep promises and pay back those you owe as soon as possible. He taught me how to project my voice, slow down my speech and to speak with emotion. He taught me how to make a presence, even if I’m only standing 4ft tall. With him leaving me, he now has taught me to appreciate not my life but the people in it.

I know I’m one in a million he has impacted, but under this circumstance I’m glad to be one in that million. I was so lucky to have had him in my life. I promised him I’d pick him up to drive him to my first speech. Where he would be sitting, smiling in the front row. I have yet to speak and for that I have let him down. I feel terrible, but I also feel motivated because I will be a product of Danny Duval. My rhetorical role model resides in heaven now, but his legacy will forever reside in my heart.

Freshman Speech— Given before the HEQF game 3 (2012)

     I’m honored to be standing before you. I’m honored to be having this opportunity to address to you who I am and where I came from. Like all of you before me you gave a speech similar to this your freshman year. For me, I was going to wait until my senior year to give my “Freshman Speech” but a group like this comes once every four years so I decided to write it a year early. By now y’all know my name is Mathew Myers. I was born December 21, 1990 in Manchester, NH. I have two of the most amazing parents, Marty and Sue. I am the oldest of 2 brothers and 1 sister; Mackenzie, Michaeli and Mitchel. I am the only one in my family born with a form of dwarfism, achondroplasia. BIG DEAL.

I learnt to skate around the same time I learnt how to walk. My father would take my brother and I to the local rinks for hours on end teaching us how to push a chair, crossover and eventually stick handle. His focus was on my brother; trying to develop him to become the next Sidney Crosby. Yet I was hooked, I wanted to play. It took a couple of years for my father to finally agree and find the right equipment to fit me. I played for my local house organization once a week for 5 years, 1 year in mites, 4 years in squirts. Boy did I have the best time of my life. I was forced to retire from the game I love at the age of 12. That didn’t stop me though; I found ways to stay involved with this game. In those 5 years I felt the game had given me so much already that I had to give back. On the ice I feel free, I feel like for once I am on an even playing surface as everyone else. For one hour, nothing else matters.

I volunteered and would run the scoreboard and score sheet on weekends. I refereed for 2 years until I realized it’s not much fun when you run into a coach like Umile. I taught kids how to skate and evaluated tryouts. I managed my high school team for four years. It was then when for the first time, I felt that feeling of what it’s like to be a part of a team. I skated at every practice, participated in every drill and was treated like every other player. I didn’t want that feeling to ever go away. I couldn’t let it disappear that easily.

My passion that burned within me allowed me to knock on coach’s door first day my freshman year. I showed up to the first practice uninvited and watched from the stands.  Coach gave me an opportunity and I took it. I didn’t travel for 2 years. Yet I worked my ass off and did whatever it took to contribute.

My whole entire life I have been overlooked; but I have taken every opportunity I have been given and have made the most out of it. You see things and ask “Why?” I dream things and say “Why not?” You need to have that mentality tonight. Who you are has always been in your hands, who you will become is still up to you. I hope you continue to work hard. I hope you continue to not cheat yourself or your teammates. Push yourself during every shift. Challenge your ability. Put your body through hell now, and you will be awarded later. That means stops and starts, that means sprinting over gliding, that means back-checking harder than you fore check. You cheat yourself now, you’ll cheat yourself later in life. Bad habits are habits and once you begin them it’s tough to get out of them.

You have all had a wonderful hockey career. Play hockey east rival B.U. with pride. Because what you are doing I will never get to experience. You are representing your school, your town, your family, but more importantly yourself. Every shift you skate, I’ll be in my box coding it with pride. My hockey career consists of 0 assists, 0 Penalty minutes, but 1 goal; to influence the game like it’s never been influenced before. I will conclude with saying my favorite movie is Simon Birch, my favorite song is Dave Matthews “Funny the way it is” and my favorite team to watch is the one before me; The University of New Hampshire Wildcat’s Mens Hockey Team.

Persuasive Speech–04/09/2011

Have you ever walked into a room and you’re either way too overdressed or underdressed? You all of a sudden enter this zone where you do not feel comfortable in. You feel like all eyes are on you and you just want to leave. Try walking into every room you have ever entered, feeling that way. I do! Every day I live my life being starred at, judged, made fun of, and questioned. I’ve never gone through a day where I don’t catch a stare, or hear a little kid asking his mom or dad why I have a big head and am so short. I can be the best looking kid, the best dressed in that room, yet all eyes are on me. Is it fair, no? Is it my life, yes?

Throughout my life I have been given gifts and qualities that people would love to have. I have dark thick hair, a physically fit body, outgoing personality, athleticism, charm, a way with words, a loving family, and the best group of friends that would have my back at any given moment. The only quality I am missing, that affects me in the real world the most, is lack of size. You are thinking so what, just because you’re not built like a professional basketball player shouldn’t ruin your life. It doesn’t at all, but in today’s society, how tall you are can say so much about the person.

When I was born, the doctor pulled out a book he found covered in dust in the bottom of his draw and laid it out on the table to give to my parents. This book went on to explain all of the challenges my life would hold; let me tell you, this book is pretty thick. The doctor went on and summarized the book by telling my parents a lot of things; that I wasn’t going to be able to ride a bike, drive a car, play any sports, succeed in school, have a job, be social…basically saying that your son is going to be “different.”  I was born with a bucket list, a list of things that would take a miracle for me to complete, a list that is now full of scratch offs and check marks. He also told my parents that there was a good chance that I was not going to live a long life. I wasn’t supposed to even make it out of the hospital through complications of health.

Achondroplasia dwarfs, the form of dwarfism I have, have a few different characteristics that you can easily point out from the moment they are born. We have a relatively long torso, compared to our arms and limbs. The pool, lakes and oceans aren’t very friendly to us come summer time for they give us ear infections all season long. Our hands, you can literally say there out of this world, because our ring finger and middle finger diverge away from each other in jealousy. Making us able to do the alien “peace be with you” symbol fairly easily. Our heads, oh boy how could you miss them? We have fairly larger heads with a prominent forehead and plenty of stories to come with it, I believe have cracked my head 6 times with a couple of scars to prove it.

Adapting is something I’m used to and seems to come second nature for me now. The first thing that had to be adapted for me was my bike. I remember having this new blue sporty bike with training wheels for my fourth birthday. The seat was nice and comfy, and my arms could reach the handle bar. The only problem was my feet couldn’t reach the peddles. My dad taped up a couple of my blocks I played with around the peddles and that solved that problem.

I later needed stools and other tools to help me navigate around my own house with no problem. We had custom wooden stools made for me so I could reach the countertops and the sink to wash my hands and brush my teeth. I also when I was really young had this instrument made to attach to door handles that had a wooden stick hang down so I could reach the door handles and open the doors that way. I also had a stick made that had a “V” shape point on the end with a mouth on the side to turn on and off the lights. My parents wanted to make the home as homey as possible for me, because I was a member of that family and I should be able to do what I want when I want at my convenience in my own home.

Fortunately for me, my life isn’t as bad as others with my condition. I thank that all to the environment I have been surrounded by; my neighborhood, my education, my parents, and my personality. I accepted myself before I could let anyone else accept me. With others though, it’s not that easy. Where and how you are raised at a young age can be the biggest difference maker when it comes to molding your attitude, personality and self-esteem. My mindset is so confident, that I have my self convinced I am no different. I don’t wake up every day saying, “oh crap, I’m different here we go again.” I put myself out there so quickly so you don’t have time to judge me on appearance. Others have it worse than me, and it is for them I am speaking for. There are over 200 different types of dwarfism, with achondroplasia being the most popular, accounting for about 70% in dwarfs. The ratio of new-borns diagnosed with dwarfism is 1 in every 25,000. Some types of dwarfism more easily noticeable than others, some involving more medical attention. Back problems and leg bowing is very common to most dwarves. Even more common, surgeries and hospital visits. Luckily I’ve only had to have one surgery performed to decrease the bowing in my legs.

Today we live in a world where if you were to ask a group of people if discrimination still exists, they would say yes but have nothing to back it up with. If you were to ask a manager if they have ever not hired someone because of their image they would deny deny deny. Everyone is guilty of it, even me. Judging people is natural, but the wall that stands between giving them an opportunity and not giving them the time of day for some people can be stronger or weaker than others. Some people won’t get over that wall, others have the attitude where they can break that barrier, and usually those are the people that experience diversity themselves, or have a family member who experiences pain.

What if Rosa Parks gave up her seat to the white passenger? What if Martin Luther dreamt about sugar-plums dancing in his head instead? What if Jackie Robinson never picked up a bat? What if Mathew Myers never gave this speech? Quite simply, we wouldn’t be living in a world full of hatred and discrimination. Imagine if you were told who your friends could be, who you could talk to, or had to drink out of a bubbler that had a sign that fit your skin color. Life would be literally so black and white. Luckily times have changed and we live in a country where your skin color doesn’t matter anymore. A country were your not supposed to discriminate. I’m just here to clean up what is left out there in discrimination and act as a reminder that all of the little discriminating that is still out there, still is painful to those it affects and needs to be put to an end.

I now come to the topic where if this were being broadcasted on live television, I would have to warn the producers to get ready to bleep out a lot of words that are about to come out of my mouth. Here comes the R-rated material. No I’m only kidding, what I’m talking about is the awful “M” word. The word I hate most in the dictionary, the word that if you want to put me in a bad mood, call me it. Yes, I’m talking about the word Midget; a word that is commonly used, but is considered highly offensive to people of short stature. It’s ok if you didn’t know that, in fact I know a lot of people didn’t know that because of today’s slang and usage in lyrics. The word midget is derived from the phrase, “small fly.” But that reasoning doesn’t bother me. It was back a while ago when little people would be used for the sole purpose of entertaining others. They would place us in the circus as multiple acts with no pay, humiliating ourselves like if we didn’t have a heart and soul. Plus the word just sounds nasty coming out of your mouth, midget ughh yuck.

I remember it was second grade and my mom was really into the whole “Mat needs a stool” everywhere he goes stage. And it was second grade and when I sit in my desk, my legs dangle the whole time and after a while your legs and feet fall asleep and it can be pretty annoying especially when you have to jump down randomly to write something on the chalkboard. I already had about 3 or 4 stools in the classroom ready for me for anything that seemed to be an obstacle for me. In comes my mom running in holding a new wooden stool, screaming “Hey Mat your new stool is ready for you for your desk, lets test it out!” Yes, it was pretty embarrassing, but the fact that she took the time out of her busy schedule to do something that extreme, shows she cares and shows the kind of character she is; putting others before herself. I try to follow that and put two people before myself always; God and YOU.

I’ve always wanted my life to be as normal as possible. I don’t want the special attention. I don’t want to be treated like the age I look, but the age I actually am. I don’t want the pity talks, I don’t want to be picked first when picking teams because you know I’ll be picked last. I want my life to be just like everyone else’s. I want to show everyone that I am no different, I am just as capable of completing every task that you and you and you can complete. I never ask for help, I never ask for extra time, and I will never let you down.

Our State has a motto: Live Free or Die. My motto is: You take one step, I take three. By this I mean that everything I do I give it all I got. I put my heart and soul into everything to prove to all the nay sayers. Everything I do I have to work three times as hard, whether its playing a sport, being the difference, or just a task as simple as walking. One of my steps equals almost 3 of your steps. My favorite quote: “When you’re like everyone else, you work hard to be different. When you’re different, you work hard to be like everyone else.” The owner of this quote is unnamed, which is unfortunate because it is so true on so many levels. How I approach this quote, is by remaining different but gaining the respect and opportunities that everyone else receives.

Conclusion:  Through what I have learnt in this class, and with a lot more practice and repetition I hope to start giving speeches like these to schools and communities nearby. I’ve been privileged to meet so many people from all different kinds of cultures and backgrounds. People that it was nice to just say hi to, and others that will always have a special place in my heart. I am the worst when it comes to remembering names, I can remember a face but never a name with a face. But I will remember you if you have impacted me in a special way. Some people come and go, some people stop and say hi, than there are some people who impact me for the rest of my life. I hope out of anything you get out of this today, is a little bit of inspiration, a little bit of motivation to go out there and make a new friend with someone you normally wouldn’t talk to. I hope you come away with the knowledge that it is okay to be different, realistically everyone’s different in their own way and that’s why we’re all special. I don’t blame anyone for who I am, I take the little I’m given and create something beautiful out of it.

The Pep Talk from Durham–Given before the last game of the season, Sophomore year (2011)

“I’ve got a task for you boys; can you be perfect for three more games? You’ve been told your whole life that no one’s perfect, no one rises above everyone else without a single flaw. That is true as a human being and as you develop into the character you are today. But I believe in hockey you can be perfect for a game or three. In hockey, being perfect isn’t having the sickest celly after the game winner, or going bar down every shot you take. In hockey being perfect is doing the little things, playing two way hockey, giving support, crashing the net, winning face offs, doing the things that aren’t mentioned on the score sheet or in the box score. Being perfect is setting your teammates up for the perfect one-timer, always playing that “pedal to the medal” mentality and being able to climb over the boards after each shift and tell your line mates and Umile, “I gave it all I had, what can I do better?” Being perfect can’t be done alone. You need a family behind you and supporting you every step of the way. That family has to have gone the through some of the same obstacles and emotions as you have on this journey. Whether that family is sitting next to you right now in the locker room or showing their support back home in Durham, wishing they could be there to celebrate afterwards, they are there and they will go the distance to have your back and be perfect too. Right now, we are an ELITE team; we are 1 of 8 teams still skating in all of NCAA. After every practice you have been bringing it in as a family and on 3 chanted, “Mo-Town” Well boys our dream will soon become a reality. Now let’s punch our ticket to Mo-Town and end Cinderella’s ball a little early tonight. Good luck boys, Can you be perfect for three more games?”

Perfect StridesGiven before NCAA Regionals freshmen year (2010)

I’ve got a task for you boys; can you be perfect for three more games? You’ve been told your whole life that no one’s perfect, no one rises above everyone else without a single flaw. That is true as a human being and as you develop into the character you are today. But I believe in hockey you can be perfect for a game or three. In hockey, being perfect isn’t having the sickest celly after the game winner, or going bar down every shot you take. In hockey being perfect is doing the little things, playing two way hockey, giving support, crashing the net, winning face offs, doing the things that aren’t mentioned on the score sheet or in the box score. Being perfect is setting your teammates up for the perfect one-timer, always playing that “pedal to the medal” mentality and being able to climb over the boards after each shift and tell your line-mates and Umile, “I gave it all had, what can I do better?” Being perfect can’t be done alone. You need a family behind you and supporting you every step of the way. That family has to have gone the through some of the same obstacles and emotions as you have on this journey. Whether that family is sitting next to you right now in the locker room or showing their support back home in Durham, wishing they could be there to celebrate afterwards, they are there and they will go the distance to have your back and be perfect too. Right now, we are an ELITE team, we are 1 of 8 teams still skating in all of NCAA. After every practice you have been bringing it in as a family and on 3 chanted, “Mo-Town” Well boys our dream will soon become a reality. Now let’s punch our ticket to Mo-Town and end Cinderella’s ball a little early tonight. Good luck boys, Can you be perfect for three more games?

Graduation Mass Speech

I’m not lying to you when I say that I wrote this speech less than 20 hours ago. It’s not because of procrastination, it’s not because I don’t want to do this speech, but it’s because of the difficulty of the speech. This is an essence, the hardest speech I’ve given because of the time limit I’m given and reflecting back on these past four years would be impossible because of all the emotion behind it and the memories that will be forever held within me.

One of my favorite moments as a class, happened to have taken place recently, our Senior Retreat. We entered St. Elizabeth Seton’s church basement all happy and excited for that upcoming night and what our future as seniors will hold, but no one at the moment knew what this retreat would turn out to be. We are gathered as a class and listened to 4 real-life stories that came from the heart of our faculty members. The atmosphere in the room was unreal, after Mr. Sheehan said his last words. Very emotional, very moving and touching, Mr. Malinowski than grabs the mic, and announces that the mics all ours, anyone that wants to share anything is free too. We all sit there patiently not wanting to be the first ones to go, or not even contemplating going at all. Jolynn starts it off by saying how much she’s going to miss this class and how much everyone means to her, that took a lot of guts and I have a lot of respect for that. Slowly but surely people start going up to the mic, classmates I wouldn’t even dream of going up there, telling us their story. We eventually had a line that lead out the door, of people willing to share their pain, to bring us closer as a class. I never got the opportunity to share my story with you, but you got to experience a chapter in my life that doesn’t start out with “once upon a time” and also doesn’t finish with “The End.” Because this isn’t the end of the friendships we’ve formed here.

Next year when you look down, and no one is there, it should act as a reminder to keep on going, because even though I might not be there in person I hope you remember that I always looked up to you guys, both physically and emotionally and that everyone in this class meant something special to me. You taught me more about myself than anyone ever has. I take pride in my classmates achievements, and with the education you’ve received and the young men and women you’ve developed into, I have a feeling I’ll be smiling for the remainder of my life. I won’t be surprised if I see a politicians sign on my front lawn with the name Rahill or Kelekci on it. I see myself owning Dylan’s, Sean’s, and Garrett’s autographed rookie card in the next 5-6 years. I also even see myself getting pulled over for speeding by Officer Gagnon. As for me, I hope I’m just remembered as the kid whose heart was bigger than his body, a kid who inspired and appreciated every opportunity he was given, that’s all.

Trinity was a perfect fit for me, unlike most of the clothes I purchase. I’ve been taught to be the salt of the world, to preach the gospel, if necessary use words, where there’s a pro, there’s a con, and when in giving, we receive. I’ve received more than I could ever ask for here at Trinity, and I thank every single person in this church right now, for having faith in our class. We did it class of 2009, we did it! Whether you’re a Wolverine, a Warrior, a Hawk, or even a Wildcat next year, always remember that you’re a Pioneer at heart and you’re always welcome to visit and expect the warm community feeling like the one you felt at Freshmen Orientation way back in 2005. Cherish the memories, love the friendships, dream the impossible. Thank you Trinity, and thank you Class of 2009, it’s been an honor serving as your class president, God Bless you all.

Graduation

I’m not lying to you when I say I wrote this speech less than 4 hours ago. I just want to take this time to thank the people that made my dream all possible. We’ve been taught at a young age to dream and dream big, and the only way to follow your dreams was by leading them. Most kids dream of becoming a doctor, a political leader, or a professional athlete. I took that basic list and started narrowing it down, becoming a doctor was not looking too good after the creation of Edline. A political leader was in the mix for a long long time, until I took Mr. Leonard’s economics class.  I was counting on the last occupation on my dream list to be eternally happy, a professional athlete. I tried golf, Tiger’s pitching wedge goes farther than my driver, tried soccer..you had to be able to run, not waddle.. tried baseball me and fastballs around the head don’t mix, fell in love with hockey, but every time I go and check someone, I got called for a leg check. That’s when I realized I had to appreciate the opportunities I’m given, and find ways to adapt in situations that seemed not possible.

I never would’ve dreamed of standing before this size of a crowd, giving a graduation speech, as class president, on a day that I will never forget. My dream though entering Trinity was to be accepted for who I am, not for what I stand for, or how tall I stand. By fulfilling my dream it took a big part of understanding from me first, I fulfilled my dream by accepting myself first, before letting anyone else accept me. All of this would not be possible if it wasn’t for my two most amazing parents, my mom’s got the same presence as I do when she walks into a room, everyone seems to love her, and no one love’s her more than her son standing at the podium now. My dad, my rolemodel, my mentor, my bestfriend, thanks for believing in me, and thanks for always loving me, give mom a tissue. Mac and Mitch, no one takes as much pride in all of you’re accomplishments as your brother, keep dreaming and working hard. Michaeli, keep smiling and doing what you do best, being the best sister a brother could ever ask for, for you’re beautiful both inside and out. Roland, thank you for everything you’ve done the past 18 years, you’re like family and networking’s everything. Finally, Matt Anctil, we did it bud! Not many kid’s can say what we can, K-12 and being bestfriends the entire way, you have so many oppurtunites ahead of you, don’t forget the people who meant the most to you, good luck at UMich, represent NH and always know you got a friend in me.

As for the rest of the senior class and teachers and faculty, here’s your shoutout, We did it seniors, I wouldn’t want to share this moment with any other group than the one standing below me on my right and left, anxiously awaiting me to wrap it up so we can make it official. Thank you teachers and faculty for being more than mentors, but being apart of an atmosphere that I would like to consider family for the past four years. Wherever your journey takes you, whoever you meet along the way, may you never forget the people that molded you who you are into today. Good Luck Class of 2009 and congratulations, for I hope to see you all in 5 years, with many stories and laughs to share.

Now let’s make this official, would the seniors please rise… Would you reach and grab your tassel and move it from the right, to the left…Ladies and Gentlemen, friends and family, I’d like to present to you, Manchester, N.H.’s Trinity High School Class of 2009!! (Throw your hat up)

Small Person, Big Heart (Written by Lindsay Johnson submitted with her college application)

The greatest feeling in the world is to know that you will always have someone by your side. When you find that special person who makes an impact on you and your life, you know you will never let them go. My best friend and my hero is a dwarf. He brings out the very best of me every day, and it is truly amazing how one individual can bring such a powerful, positive influence into my life.

I met my hero one day while shopping at a grocery store.  He was a cashier and had the longest line in the store.  I wondered why it was so long so my mother and I decided to join the line. When it was our turn to check out, we were greeted with the biggest smile ever. He knew just how to brighten up your day with his friendly and sociable personality. We connected in such an amazing way that I felt as if I had known him forever. I knew from that moment, I wanted him to be a part of my life. In my heart, I had a feeling that we were destined to be the best of friends.

Mathew was born with a type of dwarfism called achondroplasia into a family with normal size parents. He is the oldest of four children, he being the only dwarf. He never wanted sympathy and he never considered his size a disability. Even though he shared many stories with me of his childhood and being “made fun of and bullied”, this never stopped him from being proud of who he was and living his life to the fullest. He has always excelled in school, played sports, and participated in everything possible despite his height. He doesn’t want to be treated differently and has put himself out there for the world to see.

My best friend has guided me through my high school years and has taught me valuable lessons that will help me be successful. Most importantly, he has influenced me in being strong and having a positive attitude towards everything. Standing at almost four feet tall, he has the biggest heart, so much confidence, and an encouraging outlook on life. His personality and heart is what makes him fully respected, while his height is truly overlooked.  He is a normal human being and takes advantages of all the opportunities that he is given. I look up to him in all that I do and when life has its ups and downs, I think of him, stay strong, and follow my heart just like he does every single day.

Not only has Mathew been a personal inspiration to me, he has been invited to speak in front of crowds of people to share his message. He made me realize that beauty, height, and material things, are not important. He has heard it all through his life being called “wee-man, mini-me, bobble-head, oompa-loompa, elf, and of course the “M” word, midget.”  He told me that the name calling doesn’t matter because he knows that he is a terrific person with a big heart, who would do anything for anyone. If he can withstand this and all of the pressure that is put on him each and everyday, why can’t everyone be like this, I thought?  That is when it dawned on me. If my best friend can be happy despite all that he has gone through and all that he will face in this lifetime, then that is what I want for me. He has achieved his goals so far in life and there is so much more he wants to do. I believe in him and I respect him for who he is. He has made a significant impact of my life and he truly is my inspiration.

If I had never met this extraordinary person that I call my best friend, I would not be who I am today. He has shown me the world in a whole different perspective. Mathew has been a major influence on me as an individual and my life as a whole. I have learned to live my life to the fullest, never give up, and to remain happy through the good and bad times. Our friendship consists of putting our loving hearts together and lending a helping hand. Not only would he do anything for me, but I would do anything for him. He even asked me to his prom and we had an incredible time, as I danced on my knees with him all night. Our friendship grows closer and closer as the days go by and I know that he will always be a part of my life. He is truly one of a kind and I am so proud to call him my best friend.

Farewell Assembly— 2009

                There’s no better way to describe the feelings we have right now as seniors, as bittersweet. There’s no other phrase that we could express right now than thank you. Thank you Trinity for giving me a feeling of hope, a feeling that I know once I receive my diploma on the 9th, I’m ready for the next level. We owe it all to every single person in this room, and I’m sure everyone from the class of ’09 agrees. Trinity is a community so tightly knit; it’s kind of hard to explain to other people. Because everyone I’ve came across has played a role in developing me as a student and as an individual. These past four years I’ve been part of another family, a family that teaches, that’s dependable, that’s there for me, and makes me smile when it feels like nothing’s going right. Every person has contributed to making my experience here something special and meaningful.

To the freshmen, I had a great opportunity to bond with your class in a number of ways. I remember you guys walking down the entrance down a line of seniors giving high-fives, and walking into the gym introducing myself for the first time promising that this was the start of the best 4 years of your life. Also at your orientation when we volunteered in our community and ended the day with lunch and some life stories that hopefully stuck with you. You guys are a very close class and it’s going to be a real privilege for the faculty to watch you guys develops as the class of 2012.

To the sophomores, as Bon Jovi says, “your half way there.” You now know what’s expected out of you and you have a feel of what to expect the next two years. This is the part of your high school experience where if you have any weaknesses, you learn to strengthen them. You need to learn how to balance your school work and your social life, because next year’s your big year. Next year is the year that counts the most to colleges and your future. The one thing I am proud of myself for doing throughout my high school experience is being involved. There is something here for everyone to be a part of and contribute, the more you’re involved the more you’ll get out of and enjoy in your high school experience.

To the Juniors/soon to be seniors, you guys have been the closest to us. You looked up to us as freshmen for guidance and still look up to us now as role models. Work hard next year because it will get stressful and overwhelming, but senior year is all that plus exciting. You choose where you want to go next in 2 years, I wish you the best of luck and may you represent Trinity next year with pride. Think, Dream, Wish, Want, Achieve, which one are you going to do? Thank you Trinity, and farew

Freshmen Retreat— 2009

Don’t you hate it when you walk into room and you’re either way too overdressed or underdressed? You all of a sudden enter this zone where you do not feel comfortable in. You feel like all eyes are on you and you just want to leave. Try walking into every room you have ever entered, feeling that way. I do! Everyday I live my life being starred at, judged, made fun of, and questioned. I’ve never gone through a day where I don’t catch a stare, or hear a little kid asking his mom or dad why I have a big head and am so short. I can be the best looking kid, the best dressed in that room, yet all eyes are on me. Is it fair, no? Is it my life, yes?

When I was born, doctors told my parents two things. They told my parents that I was going to be born with a type of dwarfism called achondroplasia. My parents didn’t know what that meant or what symptoms came with being an achon. The only vision they had in their head was from the Disney movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. The only question they had in mind was, which one would I turn out to be, Happy, Grumpy, maybe Dopey? The second thing the doctors told my parents was that there wasn’t a great chance that I would live past the hospital stay. My dad without any hesitation called a priest over to our hospital room, where I was baptized for the first time. Later on I had a more formal baptism at St. Catherine’s where family and friends attended.

I am seventeen years old and stand at four feet tall. I live in a world that wasn’t made for me. I have the two most amazing parents who should be proud for the job they’ve done raising a son, who doesn’t see himself as any different.  I’m given every opportunity a 6 ft person gets. Because of my personality, heart, and attitude I am respected and my height is overlooked. I like to take opportunities that are given and use it to my advantage. I will find a way to make things adaptable for me.

Everyday I experience pain, but that doesn’t stop me. I experience discrimination, it makes me stronger. I experience support, which makes me feel wanted. I know I can always count on my family through the rough times. My friends accept me and watch out for me. I attended a LPA convention and brought a long two of my best friends to show them what it’s like in our world. We were in a meeting with all teenage dwarfs and we all shared our experiences and what the ups and downs of being a dwarf were. My friend Dylan Clark spoke and it really touched me. He said that he doesn’t like it when people stare and comment, he feels bad when situations like that occur. He doesn’t like it when I can’t compete or take part in activities because of my height. He says that he would do anything for me and made sure that I felt like I belonged.

I use to be the kid that would observe everything going on around him. I wouldn’t interact that much because I would always think I was being judged twenty-four seven. I thought I was part of a minority that was the living example of people who shouldn’t be on this earth. I’ve heard it all throughout my life, smurf, wee-man, mini-me, bobble-head, clown, oompa-loompa, elf, Zach Roloff, and of course the “M” word, midget. The most derogatory word out there for us LP’s. I always thought that if you were tall you’d ball, and if you were small, you’d fall, until I decided to take control. I wouldn’t allow myself to fall into that situation and decided to put myself out there for everyone to see who I really am. Of course, in the end you are entitled to your own opinion, but I feel my new strategy people like a lot more than my old one.

If I had the opportunity to start my life over from day one and be born of average height, I wouldn’t. I love who I am and what I have become. I believe I have just as much potential than the person sitting next to me. I put my heart and soul in everything I do. I know I have to work extra hard to be respected. I will never forget something my dad said that has really motivated me. I showed him my report card one day and he wasn’t very pleased with it. He told me that I will not be hired to dig a hole, but I will be hired to think of ways of how to dig that hole. What he meant by that was that I wouldn’t be hired to perform physical labor. I will be hired to be the thinker, do the labor that involves thinking and brainstorming. That’s something that I will never forget and thank my parents. They are giving me opportunities that most kids won’t get. Every door is open for me. I just have to follow my dream.

I was given a gift, to attend Trinity High School. A school that I’ve heard nothing but good things from, and heard from prior teachers that it would be a good fit for me. I was probably standing at 3’6” walking down the halls on day one of freshmen year. I’m walking down the halls heading to Mrs. Belushko’s class with a big smile on my face. I’m feeling pretty cool giving high fives to upperclassmen as a walk to class. At this point, I’m feeling like nothing can intimidate me. That suddenly changed when I look right and see big Mr. Smith standing in the doorway, saying, “Myers, tuck in your shirt.” Still to this day, Mr. Smith intimidates me, but that never stopped me from giving my high-fives.

From that day on, a school with arms wide open welcomed me. It was so easy to adapt and find new friends and keep the old ones that would share memories with you that will last me the rest of my life. Trinity has allowed me to expand and show my fullest potential. I can be whatever I want to be when I’m here. If I want to be president I can be president, if I want to help out the hockey team, I can help out the hockey team. I owe a lot of people more than I can offer throughout my life, and a lot of people on that list, have been apart of my Trinity experience. The best decision I’ve made so far in my life is attending this high school, cause it was an option. I hope you enjoy these next four years and let nothing stop you from being who you truly are. You will find deep down inside who you really are and what your purpose is while you’re at Trinity, use it as an advantage. Ask me questions throughout your first year here. You can pull me aside and talk to me about anything, school related or not. I’m also open to talk more about the ups and downs of being a dwarf. I want you to have the same freshmen experience I did, and that was a pretty good one. Thank you for listening to my story, and now I leave you with this one question, Who’s going to “bring the flavor?”

Farewell Speech to Andrew Nelson— 2008

Throughout my lifetime I’ve met very special people that leave impressions on who I am today and what I will become. There are a lot of good people in this world and I’m blessed to have met Mr. Nelson along my journey.  But I don’t think I have ever met someone so genuine, so funny, so full of life, and so thankful for everything he is given.  I’ve always looked upon adults for advice, decisions, safety, support, and comfort. I can go stick my head into Campus Ministry whenever I like and talk to him about any issue that I am facing.

I can truly say that in my opinion Mr. Nelson is the face of this school. He’s always filled with Pride, Spirit, and Tradition. He organizes big events with little time or help. He can take upon the biggest tasks this city has ever asked upon to sort food, and rally up the entire school and get the job done. He puts our religion in a fun and educative way. He is a leader that we all trust and when called upon respond too. The Union Leader in the past has always praised the public city schools. It seemed like in the past years that we’d feed four hundred homeless people and get no recognition, while Central would feed a dozen people, and yet be on the front cover of the newspaper. But this year would be different; Mr. Nelson received the recognition he deserved by representing the pioneers on the Pope’s visit to our country, and leading Trinity into bettering the community.

That’s the biggest reason why I love it here. The community here is so strong and full of love. I was nervous first entering high school; I thought I would be the target for all of the bullies. I was 100% wrong; everyone here is welcomed with arms wide open. Everyone here is here for a reason. We all want to be educated, while in a community full of love and joy. Mr. Nelson has made my experience hear at Trinity beyond belief. I’ve grown up always wanting to become a leader. He is a leader in every sense. He has with out a doubt the best personality I have ever met. He can take charge and follow through on jobs most people would quit on.

My most recent experience with Mr. Nelson is a story I would like to share. It shows Mr. Nelson’s true character and heart. It was the Tuesday we returned back to school following the devastating Pearle St. fire that weekend. Sarah Bourque and I were interviewed a couple of months prior and we were selected to be on the front cover of the NH Catholic Papal magazine. We were told to meet Mr. Nelson at 9:30 a.m. in the office to leave for the photo shoot. Sarah and I are all dressed up in formal attire, waiting for Mr. Nelson. Mr. Nelson is no where to be found, we finally find him 5 minutes later putting together the final pieces of the puzzle for the Invisible Child project he was running. We were than told by Mrs. Tortollini that our photo shoot was at 8:45 a.m. and they’re waiting for us. We hop into the Campus Ministry car that has about a gallon left of gas and make our way to Commercial St. Mr. Nelson is calling the lady in charge and telling her that we are on our way and at the same time asking for directions. We cannot find this building what so ever. We are looking for 57 Commercial St. and we found 507 Commercial St. We stopped and parked at the first available parking spot and the machine wasn’t taking his credit card. The wind is blowing strong and I’m struggling running, trying to keep up with them. We find out that were at the wrong building and have to drive around some more. Mr. Nelson was thanking God, for the machine that didn’t accept his credit card.

We run into the building and he asks a man to hold the elevator open for us. This man is very quiet and rude and doesn’t respond to Mr. Nelson when he thanks him and asks how he’s doing. The elevator than starts to go up on floor and stops, Mr. Nelson than murmurs something like, “Who’s the idiot that hit the button to get off this floor,” expecting that it was me, because I hit the button for the floor that we’re supposed to get off. The elevator door opens and out walks the man who held the door open for us. Mr. Nelson felt so bad and embarrassed that it was hilarious. We run into the photographer’s office and find two other Catholic Schools waiting for us to start taking pictures. Mr. Nelson was being very sincere and apologizing for our tardiness. Know one minded, especially the 4 other students who represented St. Thomas, and Bishop Brady. The adult representing Bishop Brady was having a conversation with Mr. Nelson and had nothing but good things to say about him and our school. It was like Mr. Nelson didn’t even have to introduce himself because she had read all of the articles in the paper. When she had said to Mr. Nelson, “I have read many articles in the paper about you and have heard nothing but good things about you. The things you do over at Trinity are amazing and what a special guy Trinity really has,” really got me thinking and appreciating Mr. Nelson. I felt honored to represent Trinity along with Mr. Nelson and Sarah at such an event. The whole morning the ladies are cracking jokes to Mr. Nelson about us being late. Mr. Nelson was a trooper and laughed at the jokes and offered to treat them all to lunch after. Who would’ve thought that that offer was a bad idea? We all arrive at Gillian’s on Bridge St. and Mr. Nelson tells all of us to order whatever we like. We all eat and have a good time sharing stories. The bill comes along and Mr. Nelson flashes his credit card. The waitress than tells him that they don’t accept credit cards. Unfortunately for Mr. Nelson, that was the only form of payment he had on him. We are walking back to the car and straight ahead of us was St. Joe’s. At St. Joe’s were the victims of the Pearle St. fire were being held, Mr. Nelson told us that he wanted us to spend the rest of the day there, but he didn’t think the administration would be to happy. We than returned back to school finishing up our school day.

Thank you Mr. Nelson for everything you’ve done for me, and my three-year experience here at Trinity. You are someone that I will never forget and will always pray for at night. I wish you the best of luck on your journey through priesthood. You have left an impact so deep in my heart that it will never go away. You are a role model for everyone that you have ever come in contact with. I hope that one day I will become as nice and as giving of a man as you are. It really stinks that you couldn’t have waited for at least one more year, but you have to do what God’s telling you to do. Follow your heart, have passion in everything you achieve, but others in front of you are just a few of the things you have taught me and that I live by everyday. No one will ever replace you, may you always remember that you are a Pioneer at heart. Thank you from the bottom of my heart and May God bless you.

Trinity Open House–2007

                I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to Trinity High School. My name is Mathew Myers and I am a Senior. I am active in a lot of activities at Trinity, I am our Senior Class President, I am apart of Student Council, Campus Ministry, Varsity Golf, and I help out with our Ice Hockey Team. I live my life being starred at, judged, made fun of, and questioned. I’ve never gone through a day where I don’t catch a stare, or hear a little kid asking his mom or dad why I have a big head and am so short. Because of my personality, my heart, and my attitude I am respected and my height is overlooked. I like to take opportunities that are given and use it to my advantage. I will find a way to make things adaptable for me. I am given every opportunity a six foot person gets.

If I had the opportunity to start my life over from day one and be born of average height, I wouldn’t. I love who I am and what I have become. I believe I have just as much potential than the person sitting next to me. I put my heart and soul in everything I do. I know I have to work extra hard to be respected. Trinity gives me opportunities that most high school students wouldn’t get. Every door is open for me. I just have to follow my dream.

I was given a gift, to attend Trinity High School. A school that I’ve heard nothing but good things from, and heard from prior teachers that it would be a good fit for me. I was probably standing at 3’6” walking down the halls on day one of freshmen year. I’m walking down the halls heading to Mrs. Belushko’s class with a big smile on my face. I’m feeling pretty cool giving high fives to upperclassmen as a walk to class. At this point, I’m feeling like nothing can intimidate me. That suddenly changed when I look right and see big Mr. Smith standing in the doorway, saying, “Myers, tuck in your shirt.” Still to this day, Mr. Smith intimidates me, but that never stopped me from giving my high-fives.

From that day on, a school with arms wide open welcomed me. It was so easy to adapt and find new friends and keep the old ones that I would share memories with that will last me the rest of my life. Trinity has allowed me to expand and show my fullest potential. I can be whatever I want to be when I’m here. If I want to be president I can be president, if I want to help out the hockey team, I can help out the hockey team. I owe a lot of people more than I can offer throughout my life, and a lot of people on that list, have been apart of my Trinity experience. The best decision I’ve made so far in my life is attending this high school, because it was an option. I hope you enjoy these next four years and let nothing stop you from being who you truly are. You will find deep down inside who you really are and what your purpose is while you’re at Trinity, use it as an advantage.

Trinity has a well-known reputation not only in the state of New Hampshire, but throughout the country.

Let me know what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s